March 17, 2022

Goldthread

Goldthread

This week Brian is joined by Kaylene and Lauren from Goldthread.

Goldthread are an alternative rock/dark pop female-fronted band based in Cleveland, Ohio

Goldthread has taken their rock and roll souls together with their honest lyricism and catchy melodies to repair their broken pieces and create dynamic, sweeping music straight from their heart. Influenced by bands such as Pvris, Emarosa, and I the Mighty. Genre-fluid, melodic, and thoughtfully incisive, Goldthread aims to connect with other lost souls to make something beautiful out of the collective mire. Working with producer Phoenix Arn- Horn (Courage my Love), Dear Icarus is the band’s first EP, released in 2021, that tells the story of falling and having the strength to get back up.

Tune in to hear all about the bands history, Dear Icarus and their future plans.

Find Goldthread here:

https://open.spotify.com/artist/7EhTdnsp6avdIHJKeAJ8VE?si=Tfl5554vRYuo7MJzEQZAog 

Facebook.com/goldthreadband 

Instagram.com/goldthreadband

Tiffany Skylight Music Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmNhx1c-vQI

Find CTMU here:  

https://linktr.ee/Concertsthatmadeus  

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Transcript

Brian:
You. Hey, welcome to another episode of concerts that made us. I am your host, Brian. And before we get into this week's episode, the answer to last week's music trivia question was, of course, John Lennon. He was the very first artist to be featured as the cover story for rolling stone. Now, this week's music trivia question, who holds the record for being featured on the cover of rolling stone the most? And we've got another five star review. Five stars, great content and easy to follow along. Good chemistry. This was left by BSc on itunes. And don't forget, if you leave a five star review, it will be read out on the show. Now, the reason you've all come here this week, I'm joined by Kaylene and Lauren from the band Goldthread. They're a great band with some really interesting music. So without further Ado, let's get on with the show.


Hey, guys. You're very welcome to concerts that may at us. 

Goldthread:
Hey, how's it going? Thank you so much for having us. 

Brian:
I'm delighted to have you. How are you doing this evening? 

Goldthread:
Pretty good. Can't complain. Just hanging around, enjoying some wonderful Ohio weather. 

Brian:
Brilliant. A bit like myself. I was telling you before we press record, we're having awful storms over here at the moment, so it's been a fun day. 

Goldthread:
Yeah. It sounds like craziness kind of everywhere that time of the year. 

Brian:
Yeah. Roll on the summer, huh? Yeah. So we opened a show, your song Legacy. Would you like to tell us a bit about us? 

Goldthread:
Yeah. So the song legacy, we wrote it kind of around my experience, kind of growing up in a broken home and what it's like to feel like you have a legacy on you or something that you still have to work through remnants of your past, basically, that you have to reconcile with. So we kind of took that story and tried to make something beautiful out of it and make something that people connect to. The word legacy normally has a positive connotation to it. So I just thought it was really interesting from a lyrical perspective to write about it in that negative light sometimes legacies that people leave you aren't always positive. 

Brian:
Yeah. That's an interesting take on it. All right. You're totally right. When you hear the word legacy, you automatically think that's a good thing. But I like how you flip it on its head and give it new meaning almost. 

Goldthread
Yeah. And I think that helped me to kind of reconcile my family of origin because it's kind of a secondary game, because I'm resilient for it. It's not good that it happened, but I'm alive and I'm here despite it. So it was a good thing, I think, for me to work through. 

Brian:
I love how music has the power to do that through some pretty horrible times. I'd like to hear a bit about your musical history. Do you remember what your very first musical memory was? 

Goldthread:
Oh, man, I've been playing music forever. So my uncle is a classical piano player and performer, so I took lessons from him. So it was always part of my house and part of just growing up, I guess. And I think the first time I ever really felt connected was we got to see the transeverian Orchestra when I was, like ten or eleven or so. And I just remember being in the audience and being like, oh, cool, having my first head bang moment. And I was like, this is what I want to do. This is great. I think my story is pretty similar, too. Like, the earliest things that I can remember are my mom forcing myself and my older sister sit through piano lessons, and I don't think either of us particularly enjoyed it. I mean, when you're a kid sitting there like, hey, play this scale, you're like, no, if he was not interesting to kids, I'm glad I did it. I wish that I had stuck with it. Yeah. But that's probably my earliest memory. And I think kind of same thing of like, what really got me hooked was going to, like, a Coldplay concert for the first time and seeing the light show behind them and just the energy that live music can have. I think that was first time I was like, Whoa, I would want to do that. 

Brian:
I think it's funny how, as you mentioned, when you're a kid, I think people approach music wrong and trying to get kids into music, it really takes the fun out of us. I remember being in school over here and we were forced to do music classes, but we were told we had to pick one of two instruments. It was either a team whistle or a recorder. Not the most fun. 

Goldthread:
It's got the worst sound.

Brian:
Yeah. And then even at that, I'm sure in other schools, if it was guitar piano, you think to yourself, oh, cool, I'm going to be like the people I see on TV or hear on the radio. They pick the most boring songs to make you learn. And then what kid is going to want to stick with that? 

Goldthread:
If they're learning songs that they don't care about and that they don't relate to or connect to at all, let me learn something that I like to do. 

Brian:
Yeah. As you mentioned, Coldplay made you realize you wanted to be a musician. What age were you around then when you did realize, oh, I want to be like them? 

Goldthread:
I was probably like nine or ten. I was pretty young. My dad honestly kind of dragged us along because he loved them and we would listen to them on road trips all the time in the X and Y and Russia blood to the head era. So he was the one that kind of dragged us along, but it's awesome. 

Brian:
Yeah. I haven't had the chance to see them myself, but they'd be pretty epic. They're London band styles. I think everybody has at least one or two of their songs that they love. They've been around that long. So what was the next step? Then, after realizing you wanted to be a musician, what were the steps that you took? 

Goldthread:
Yeah, I think after the longest time, like, in middle school and high school, I would spend a lot of time writing, like, solo stuff. And oddly enough, what sparked a lot is my parents bought, like, just a Mac computer and I found GarageBand and I was like, this is the greatest thing. I can take stacks of instruments and actually form a song from it. They all sound horrible, but at the time, it was just such creative freedom to be able to actually make vocal layers or stack two guitars and do all this stuff. So that's where I spent a lot of time after that until I got to a point, probably in College, where I was like, yeah, I actually want to play a live show because I was so shy growing up. I did not want to be on a stage. It was way too intimidating. So I think it took me a couple of years to get over that and then I guess the rest is history after that. Let's see. I think as soon as I got a guitar and felt like I was learning music that I wanted to play and wanted to sing along with, that's kind of what started my journey. But I think kind of growing up with emo culture being as popular as it was when I was in middle school and high school, I think it kind of started as a joke that I was like, oh, yeah, I'm going to write emo poetry, I'm going to write about my feelings. And then I turned out to be pretty decent at it and I really liked it. And I was like, oh, this isn't a joke anymore. I really like this. That's how the cults get you. Yeah. So, yeah, I just started writing a little bit more and then started pairing it with guitar. And that's kind of the way it stayed until you dragged me out of retirement. 

Brian:
When you were going through your teen years, then, was there a scene? Was there lasts for people in school that had bands were playing instruments? 

Goldthread:
I wish, but no, we actually went to a really conservative private high school, so I was the only emo kid in my grade, maybe like one of five of them in the school. So I was just like, oh, I'm so different. But it kind of forced me to like, this is something I love, so I'm going to pursue it, even though it felt like a weird, like, going against the grain kind of thing. But I wish I would have grown up with a ton of bands and seen kids and everything, because once I finally found that as an adult, I was like, oh, my people, this is nice. 

Brian:
You're probably one of the few people I've spoken to know that didn't have gas when they were growing up. Nearly every second person. I remember when I was in school, nearly everybody had a guitar or drum kit and wants to be a rock star. Yeah, that was probably the only good thing about it. So what steps did you take them from Das to playing your first gig? 

Goldthread:
My first band was with my cousin, who's a really talented singer, and she's like a year or two older than me, and she basically one day sat down, was like, okay, you can play guitar, right? I was like, yeah, sort of. She was like, yeah, let's make a band. Let's play a show. But it was mostly just like Church group stuff. It didn't really feel too official, like a rock show? Yeah, it was not a rock show. But after that little project kind of fell through, Kaleen hit me up a couple of years later and she was like, hey, we can play shows. Like, I have a connection. Like, I have a bassist, I have all sorts of, like, stuff. And I was like, I don't know, but she kind of beat the door down a little bit and the rest is history. And I feel like we've skipped a bit with you. Kaleine from your just before calling her and getting her into playing shows. What happened with you? Yeah, like I said, I was really introverted growing up, so the thought of playing a show really just terrified me until I was older. I really just spent so much time working on solo stuff where I could kind of like hide behind computers and hide in, like, a little office and work on stuff. So I did like a solo EP with a producer in Cleveland and just kind of release that just on my own and then realized that I didn't really want to be a solo act. So just pulled in, like, people that I knew played instruments, which, as we mentioned, was not a lot. So hit her up and was like, yes, let's do it. I need a guitar player. 

Brian:
Did your sound come naturally? It's a very distinctive sound. It's hard to almost put it into one genre. It's like dark pop. I've been listening to it now for the last couple of weeks, and I've tried my hardest to put it into a genre, and I just can't. So how did you actually find your sound? 

Goldthread:
Oh man I keep hoping that someone else will be like, this is what your genre? This is a problem for us. What is it exactly? I mean, honestly, I think that's kind of what I enjoy about it a lot is we can be a little bit more genre fluid, as long as it's something that we enjoy writing and playing. And it gives us freedom for every song to kind of take its own shape and its own voice. Like, we're not trying to fit in a box. We kind of let the song lead us to where it goes. But we started our first band. We called The Keys and Corridors, and we didn't really know what we were doing. We didn't have a genre in mind. We were just so excited to have a group of friends in the same room playing music together. So, yeah, a lot of that music ended up being really power chord heavy and just, like, jump on a stage to walk out. So after a couple of years of doing that and learning a lot and us maturing as people and as musicians, we kind of had a group of songs that we knew were a little bit different and kind of reflected that maturity. So that's when we decided, okay, this is worth an overhaul. This is worth actually rebranding and becoming this new band Gold Thread. So it's good to hear that it's still a little bit confusing. Genre fluid, like, that's a good thing. 

Brian:
Yeah, it definitely makes you unique. It's definitely a good thing. So you guys formed in 2019, I take it that was before the Pandemic, was it? 

Goldthread:
Yes, it was right before the Pandemic. Like, the months leading up to it, we were working on the album and the music videos and all this stuff. We had a lot of behind the scenes work, and then the world shut down entirely, and we were like, well, all right. Yeah. After a while during the Pandemic, we were like, there's no point in sitting on all this material that we've had done for a couple of months now. So we just were like, whatever, let's just release it. We can't tour anything right now. But clearly sticking around, that really was a nightmare for the music industry globally. 

Brian:
I can't imagine what it felt like just to be starting the band, and then everything closes. So I take it must have been more so an online presence you try to build than a face to face presence. How did you approach that? 

Goldthread:
Yeah, I think we spent a lot of time kind of working on teaser images and teaser videos and things that would kind of build hype online and the money that we normally would have taken to try to put together a show and do that. Instead, we were taking that money and putting it into ads and trying to just reach people online. Because during the Pandemic, I don't know about you, but all I did was pretty much watch TV and Scroll Facebook, just channeling the money into a different Avenue to try to just get to people because you're not reaching fans at shows anymore. Well, and I think we spent a lot of time just working on ourselves as people. I think it was a really difficult time for everyone, no matter how you slice it. So kind of getting through our own battles was a big, important part of that, and I think things are looking up, so that's good, and it's good to feel like shows are finally starting to come back and things are starting to feel safer. So that's good because I really needed live music. 

Brian:
Yeah, that's for sure. Has there been any shows where you guys are concerts allowed to happen yet? 

Goldthread:
Yeah, there have been a couple. I think what we've kind of found with everything coming back is there used to be, like, a lot of middle ground where if you're not top of the line touring arenas kind of stuff, there is, like a good middle ground where as a local band, you could get a support slot on kind of like a medium range. Yeah, like a regional act. Like a regional, we would be able to meet them and open up a show for them. But that kind of changed, I think. Yeah. And now, like, you kind of come back from the pandemic and it's divided even more where I don't think a lot of those regional acts are really going through the bother of putting, like, a local band on it or putting, like, support acts on it. They're just like, well, we can tour through anyway. We don't really need a local. So I think it kind of has forced a lot of, like, smaller bands kind of out of the scene a little bit. At least that's what we've noticed. So shows are coming back, but it's kind of just like refinding the footing of where you fit in as a band and trying to get back into shows. So it's kind of weird our government is set up where it's basically up to the States to be like, okay, do you want a math mandate? Do you want to restrict stuff? And just because things open doesn't mean that it's so different or that consistent across state lines. Exactly. We're still kind of in this weird trying to figure it out, trying to find our footing a little bit, but it's just nice that it's coming back in any capacity and in a way that feels safe, too. I don't want to compromise anybody's health, but I do miss music. 

Brian:
Yeah. Over here, just before Christmas, there was loads of concerts announced for this year, and then two weeks later, some big name band start canceling their shows. But a lot have kept the dead so far. But yesterday it was announced that you will not in, I think, the end of February. Some days you will no longer need masks. So for me, that kind of makes going to a concert a bit kind of cagey because you know how wild a concert can get if nobody is wearing masks. I don't know whether or not I'd be comfortable. 

Goldthread:
Yeah. Everyone kind of up against each other, like shoulder to shoulder. It is surreal being back in a crowd. I'm like, I shouldn't be doing this. This is weird. It's like extra panic because you're like, oh my gosh, everyone's breathing on me. Like, before I say, I'm like, I wouldn't have cared. Like, your social battery drains so much faster because I'm just not used to being around people anymore. So I'm like, all right, too many people step in my foot. I got to go. It's different for sure. 

Brian:
Yeah, it really is. How do you guys find your social reach online, so to speak? Because I know a lot of people say you put up something, and if you have like, 1000 fans, you'll be looking at 50 of those guys. See you at how do you guys find us? 

Goldthread:
Yes, I think every band is kind of navigating that and has been since Facebook and Instagram and all that really took over. There's some bands that are so good at the social aspect of it. I don't know. It's hard to catch the algorithm. Sometimes it feels like just catching a lucky break, like anything else. But I think our strategy kind of going in has always been like, if our music is authentic and we're authentic and we're trying to genuinely connect with people and we're stoked on our music, then the right people will find us. Our strategy, I guess, is just to try to put out the best music that we can and put ads behind that and hope that people catch on, I guess, right? Yeah. I think it's obviously hard because even if you spend, like, five or $10 for one Facebook ad, it might bring that number from 50 people to 300 people. I don't know. It's kind of a weird world. It's a give and take. You kind of have to think about what matters and what doesn't, I guess, and kind of what's worth the money and what's not. So I don't know. I honestly don't think that we're great at it. It's kind of. It's a constant battle, and I think some bands are better than other bands. I don't know. 

Brian:
Yeah, I think it's a learning curve for everyone. Even with the podcast, I'm still learning and I'd keep missing the Mark. And then one week I'll get tons of views on an ad and I'll be like, what did I do? How do I repeat it exactly? It's a bit of a headache. I think it's an unnecessary headache that bands need. There's enough hard work being in a band without having to worry about algorithms and stuff like that. So you guys released your debut EP in July. How did you go from forming a band at the start of the Pandemic to actually being able to put out an EP then in the middle of the Pandemic? 

Goldthread:
Luckily everything was done, like, right before the world shut down. Like, we finished the music video for Tiffany Skylight on New Year's Eve, like, right before. Everything just totally locked down. So all of the content from that release was pretty much done, like, prepandemic. I think, where we're kind of struggling now, it's like, okay, we made the decision to release that in the Middle of the pandemic. Now we have new stuff that we're working on and want to record, and it's trying to navigate it now where things are still kind of in this half shutdown mode. We record with a producer in Canada, but the borders been open and then closed and then closed. It's trying to figure out where we go from here, I guess, because we didn't really have to do a ton in the middle of the pandemic. Most of it was done.

Brian:
You mentioned Tiffany Skylight, the video for that. Oh, my God. Seriously, guys Definitely. It has to win awards. Oh, my God. Any of the listeners then need to look it up straight away, pause this interview, go look it up and come back. Can you explain a bit with us? 

Goldthread:
Yeah. So we wrote the song kind of about a dark subject matter, and I try to tell the story as fast as I can because it is kind of long and long. There are just so many little snippets of the story that are so interesting. I think I've got it down to, like, a 32nd explanation. But basically, we wrote the song about a man who killed his family, and basically he lost his job, and instead of telling his rich family that the money was gone, he decided to kill everybody instead, which is crazy and dark and nuts. But he ended up laying all their bodies down in this ballroom in their house they didn't even use. And then he skiptown. Nobody found him for, like, 25 years. Something ridiculous. But the thing about that ballroom was that the Tiffany skylight above it was worth more than the debt that he had accrued. So had he literally looked up and kind of thought through his options. None of the tragedy had to happen. So we listened to that story on a true crime podcast, and we looked at each other. We were like, so we have to talk about that, right? And once we had that idea, we were like, okay, well, the visual, we have to match how awesome and crazy that twist of the story is. So we went to Chicago, where the world's largest Tiffany skylight is, and filmed underneath it. And it was so beautiful. Crazy. As soon as we found out that the world's largest hand painted Tiffany skylight was in Chicago and then also found out that they were going to let us film there, we were like, get in the van. We got to go. We're doing it. It was too perfect. It was honestly such a surreal experience. Like, you can walk into that building, and if you stand directly under it and look up it fills your entire field of vision. It's so surreal. It's massive. And the dancers, they did a really amazing job of conveying the emotion that we wanted behind it, of kind of a desperate. Yeah, like that push and pull. Yeah. A love song about love that isn't working or like a toxic relationship. And I think having that as the visual Underneath the Skylight was really amazing. I was so proud of how that came out. 

Brian:
That must have been a point in your career so far where you're like, We've made our things are definitely starting to come together. 

Goldthread:
It felt good. Yeah, definitely just it fit the vibe of the song, and it made a lot of sense thematically. It was definitely crazy, and it was the last thing that we did before the world shut down. So we look back on it, we're like, oh, my God, we definitely have the rose colored glasses on, that for sure. But it was great. It was really great. And how was the reception to the EP when it released? I think a lot of people were kind of surprised. Some of our core fans have been around for the first project and saw and listened to music from Keys and Corridors. So I think people were just kind of like, oh, this is different than Keys and Corridors stuff. And hopefully in a good way. I mean, my cousin has the cutest reaction because she was my first band member. She heard all the synthesizers and everything start on Cry Wolf, and she just, like, started crying, and she was like, I'm just so proud of you. Okay, thanks. But yeah, I think it's been good. 

Brian:
Yes, it's a great record. Honestly, I'm not just pulling your leg when I say I've been listening to a nonstop last couple of weeks. It's genuinely stuck in my head, and I can't wait for the listeners to start listening to it. They're definitely going to love it. So what are the future plans for? Is there an EP on the way? 

Goldthread:
Yeah, we have lots of nice little home demos, some really crappy demos from our attic that we're just kind of waiting for the right time to head back up to the studio and put the finishing touches on it so that we can actually follow up the album with some more singles and stuff. So I think that's kind of the immediate next thing on our list. 

Brian:
The music industry as a whole is kind of interesting nowadays, isn't it? Compared to years ago, where you have to play a lot of gigs and hopefully be discovered? Do you think it's better the way it is nowadays? Because while there is bands like yourselves that are great, there is a lot of people that have access to being able to release music that maybe shouldn't be, if you know what I mean. 

Goldthread:
Yeah, it's definitely a pros and cons thing. Yeah. With so many people having the ability to make something. It almost floods the market a little bit or inundates it. But I think what it does ultimately is it forces good bands to be better, and it forces everybody to kind of step up their game a little bit. And I think that's an interesting part for me, at least, because I'll listen to a band and be like, oh, they're super good. I'm competing with the top. Like, I can listen to bring me the horizon on my phone, or I can listen to us. And it's like, you got to choose. Definitely. I think it has goods and bads. I think it's created a lot more avenues for people to be discovered, and I think it gives people a lot more access to recording and gear and all this stuff. Before you couldn't record unless you were already on a label or had access to expensive Studios and stuff like that. You didn't even have a way to get your music out there unless you were playing live. And now you don't even have to step on a stage to release a song. And I think it's led to a lot more music being generated in different sounds and different genres and stuff. And I think that's really cool. It's like a lot more inspiration to draw from. But yet at the same time, it's like so many bands, so many artists, so many songwriters. It's like even more difficult to find that needle in a haystack band that you really like. Yeah. I think what it forces the most out of me is it's so easy to be jealous of somebody else's success that they find. I don't know if you're able to play, like, a huge show that I would only dream about, but I think the biggest takeaway I have is that other band's success isn't my failure, and it doesn't have to be that cut throat. Nobody's forcing. I don't know. I find that I find a lot of inner peace with trying to deal with that. 

Brian:
That's a great way to look at it. Really good outlook to have because it can get on top of you at times and kind of bring you down when you see others doing so well and it's almost in your face and you automatically judge yourself off them. I really like your outlook. 

Goldthread:
Yeah. It was hard fought for a couple of years.

Brian:
So Besides the pandemic, what was the hardest thing you've had to overcome in your career so far to get to this point? 

Goldthread:
I think a lot of it has been the people that you kind of surround yourself with and finding the right not even just the right band, but the right people around you. And in the past, we've had a lot of people that just have wanted to play music just because it's fun and it's something to do, but they don't want to make it a career. They don't want to really push it to the next level or even vice versa. People who are in the business side of it who don't really care about your music and just want your money. And I think it's hard to kind of find this line of, like, just surrounding yourself with the right people in all aspects of what you're doing. It's been a really hard lesson to learn. Yeah, I'd say. 

Brian:
So how do you feel about nowadays when you're a musician? You kind of have to be, like almost a business person as well. You have to really do most of the business stuff yourself, as well as the creative process. That must be kind of hard to balance it, I think. 

Goldthread:
So it's hard wearing all those different kinds of hats and feeling like you're not neglecting something. So if I feel like I'm on my phone trying to research socials, then I'm not writing a song. I can only be pulled so many directions at once, but I think we've gotten pretty decent at juggling. Yeah. I think our passion has just always been in the music, so it takes conscious effort to go outside of that and be like, okay, we have to actually think about it. Like, it's a product where I'm like, I just want to go record stuff or I just want to make music. The business side is totally different world. Yes. It's not exactly the fun part.

Brian:
So when you guys can play live shows again, what can people expect when they come to see you? 

Goldthread:
I think we're doing our best right now to find a way to tie in a lot of the storytelling that we love the most. So we've been trying to pepper in lots of interludes into a set and putting visuals to the music and really trying to create a show rather than just like, here's our 25 minutes set that we rehearsed a couple of times. I think, especially having missed two years of being able to perform The Fire is under my butt to make it a performance because I didn't realize how much I missed it and how much I live for that. So that's kind of where our heads been, I think, right, yeah. 

Brian:
And overall, in the last eight years you've been together, can you remember the best show you've played? 

Goldthread:
There have been a lot of good ones. I think one of my favorites, we had this random College show in North Dakota, which was like an 18 hours drive or something crazy for us, and we literally drove out there just for that show. And I remember it being like, this big kind of logistics nightmare leading up to it, like finding people to play with us and finding the right band members to bring with us because people were like, I don't want to drive that far. It's a big drive not blaming people at all. And so I think, like, we kind of had I don't even want to say low expectations, but we showed up and I think it was just everyone's nerves were a little fried and we showed up and there were like 1000 people there, and they were all going crazy during our set. And it was like, wow, what is going on? It was just wild. Everyone was just so stoked to be there. And as performers, you feed off of that energy. If the crowd is into it, you're going to be into it too. Yeah, that's for sure. 

Brian:
Do you guys prefer larger crowds or smaller crowds? 

Goldthread:
Anytime there are people who are into it, that's great because we've played packed rooms where everyone's just doing the arm cross, staring at you think, and that's the most disheartening thing in the world is feeling like people are watching their watch, waiting for you to leave. So if it's a room of 15 people, but they're into it, that's fantastic. I'd rather have that than a room of 1000 people who are born for sure. 

Brian:
Yeah, don't blame you. We'll flip it around. So do you remember the worst gig you've played or the worst experience that you've had? 

Goldthread:
Yeah, sure. so we were so excited to play in Scranton, Pennsylvania, because of the Office. It's my favorite show ever. So we were like, oh, my God, we're going to Scranton. We're going to go see Dunder Mifflin and all this stuff. But it was a show where there was an open bar and so the crowd was wasted and they didn't understand that we weren't a DJ. So they kept coming up and requesting songs and we were like, Buddy, we have a prepared set. Like, I can't just pull Sweet Caroline out of there. We had to have gotten, like ten people that came up to us requesting songs. And at one point, the same girl had come up a couple of times, and the last time she came up, I just remember her requesting song and we can't play. Have you not learned at this point that we don't like, even if I wanted to, I couldn't. Believe me, I wish that we could have because they were, like, being irritated. They were insatiable. And so the last time this girl came up, she can play this. And I was like, I'm really sorry, I can't. She said, I should have known better than like, I shouldn't have asked. I should have known. It just, like, rolled her eyes and walked away. I was like, okay, I wouldn't say it was my favorite experience. We got paid, so jokes on them. They just clearly wanted a DJ. So we could have played, like, the best set that we've ever played in our entire lives, and it just wouldn't have been what they wanted. It's like one of those things, like, there's nothing like, get up there and keep playing. It was so uncomfortable. 

Brian:
Oh, man, that sounds like quite the experience. How did they not realize it wasn't a DJ. 

Goldthread:
I don't know.

Brian:
Yeah. Oh my God. But at least it was a show. So I got to move on to the next round of questions. I usually ask everybody these so you can't get off the podcast until the answer, I'm afraid. Alright. If you could release a song and have it sell 5000 copies are influence 5000 people? Which one would you pick? 

Goldthread:
I think influence people. I think we're very drawn to the idea of just because it's so close and personal to us that music genuinely is like a way to connect with people. So I think that's kind of like the ultimate goal as a songwriter is to have someone connect with your music. 

Brian:
Yeah, exactly. That's a proper musician's answer. Yeah. After all, you know, the money won't last forever. At least a song is timeless. Next one. If you could see any performer from history in concert for one night only, who would it be? 

Goldthread:
Oh goodness. Anybody? What do you got? It'd be really cool to see Freddie Mercury. Yeah. Like he was just such an icon. That would have been pretty cool. I don't know. I think that would be my top. That's a good answer. Yeah. I don't know. There are so many people that even like current fans that I just want to see live. Right. I had tickets to go see Nothing but Thieves and then they canceled like their whole North American tour and I'm like it. Seriously careful though. Yeah. I'm still planning on going. I know. Sorry. If you don't want to break it to you, 

Brian:
That kind of sucks. Did they reschedule or just cancel. 

Goldthread:
I think they said that they're going to reschedule, but they haven't yet. I mean, I get it. Things are still super up there, especially internationally. I get it.

Brian:
The next one, it's kind of like the last question on it's more personal. If you could spend 24 hours in a room with any performer from history, who would it be? 

Goldthread:
Any performer in history. I feel like I'm going to catch you off guard with this answer, but I feel like it would actually be cool to spend 24 hours with Billie Eilish just because I feel like her social commentary on the music industry and that's a good answer. How she went from zero to 100, like so quick, especially as a female artist. Like, I know she had a hard time dealing with all that. I feel like the conversations that you have would just be so fascinating. Yeah, that's a good answer. It is. Thank you. Now you're on the spot. I know I didn't give you enough time to think. Well, for some reason the only thing I can think of is Shakespeare and I'm like that's not helpful. But he was a performer, right? Exactly. That could work. I've had more attention. 

Brian:
It'd be kind of hard to understand though. The old English way of speaking that is true. 

Goldthread:
Yeah. You spend most of your 24 hours translating. Well, I have a tanker of mead, and it would be fine. 

Brian:
Here's one off the wall. So what would you hope to learn from Shakespeare? 

Goldthread:
Oh, my God. He wrote A Good Sonnet. Yeah, I don't know. Learn how to do a good monologue. I don't know.

Brian:
And if there was a song that could appear on the soundtrack to your lives, what would it be? 

Goldthread:
Man, I feel like music changes so frequently for me, and I am the type of listener that I will obsessively listen to something for, like, a couple weeks, and then, like, almost never listen to it again. And so it's interesting to me when I go back and listen to that stuff, it just immediately transports me back to where I was when I listened to that, like, a certain point of time in my life. So I feel like that's kind of an ever changing answer for me where I can say that certain albums or certain artists even just really transport me back to a certain time in my life. I don't know. The last band that I obsessively listened to was Bill Murray, and that's, like, if I listen to that, if I listen to that, it instantly transports me back to, like, early Pandebi. Oh, my gosh. I don't know. What about you? Well, I kind of have an easy answer because the tattoo on my leg is based off of Throne by Bringing the Horizon, which I think is just a song about resilience and you can throw into the Wolves. And tomorrow I'll come back leader of the whole pack. So I like that a lot. I like that idea. Two very good answers. I love what you said, though, about music transport, and that's my favorite thing about music. 

Brian:
I'm always saying that a song could come on the radio, and I'll feel the feelings I was feeling when I first heard us, and remember everything down to the last detail. It's the power of music. It's amazing. So what do you guys like to do when you're not doing music? What's some of your favorite things Besides music? 

Goldthread:
We're such home bodies. Honestly. Such introverted. Like, hang on on the couch, people. I'm not sure if you've ever heard of Magic the Gathering. I've heard the name. I haven't looked too much into it. It's like such a nerdy card game. They have, like, an online you can play online against other people. And I got an email from them today where you're, like, you're in the top 95% or, like, top 5%. You play more than 95% of the people. 95% of people they have. I'm like, oh, my gosh, I need to do something else. I need to go outside and go on a so I feel like that takes up a lot of time, apparently. What do you do? I like video games. A lot of Pokemon lately. Yeah. The new Pokemon game has been really good. I don't know if you're a fan, but in a few years 

Brian:
I'd be more of a Red Dead Redemption or Grand Theft Auto person. Okay. 

Goldthread:
Yeah. So that's been where I've been, but yeah, anytime we get to hang out with friends and play games, that's usually our happiest. 

Brian:
Yeah, I can definitely get on board with that. So final question. The new one I've been throwing out there, is there something I should have asked you?

Goldthread:
That's a little meta reverse right there? I don't think so. Yeah. I feel like we covered a lot of the bases. I like talking about lyrics the most. So if anybody ever has a question about a specific lyric set, I'll be like, this is exactly what I was thinking and kind of like, lay down why I wrote what I wrote, but dissect her poetry. But that's just me, though I don't think anybody else is that interested in that. You'd be surprised. You'd be surprised, yeah. There's a website like Genius Lyrics or something where you can click on it and get the explanation for a little phrase that's like one of my favorite things. I'll go down rabbit trails for hours.

Participant #1:
Brilliant. So Tiffany Skylight is going to play us out this evening. Do you want to wrap up with any final words on it? 

Goldthread:
I guess just thank you so much for having us. And thanks to everyone that's out there listening, and we appreciate all the support. And if you like the music, then we like you. You don't like the music? We still like you. That sounded really sounded bad, but we like everyone.

Brian:
Hey, guys, I really hope you enjoyed this show. If you did write and review us on itunes really helps the show grow. You can find us on social media at concerts. That Mayeris podcast. And be sure to check out our website@www.concertsmedus.com. And if you'd like to support the show, you can do so by signing up at Patreon. Comconcertsmedus. We've got Three tears available. If that's something you're interested in, you'll get access to a private discard, exclusive, uncovered video versions of the podcast, early access to add free versions of the episodes, and much, much more. So until next time, keep rocking.


Hey, what are you guys still doing here? The show is over. It's over. You can go home. Go on. We'll see you next time. We'll be here.


Bye.

GoldThread Profile Photo

GoldThread

Band

Goldthread are an alternative rock/dark pop female-fronted band based in Cleveland, Ohio

Goldthread has taken their rock and roll souls together with their honest lyricism and catchy melodies to repair their broken pieces and create dynamic, sweeping music straight from their heart. Influenced by bands such as Pvris, Emarosa, and I the Mighty. Genre-fluid, melodic, and thoughtfully incisive, Goldthread aims to connect with other lost souls to make something beautiful out of the collective mire. Working with producer Phoenix Arn- Horn (Courage my Love), Dear Icarus is the band’s first EP, released in 2021, that tells the story of falling and having the strength to get back up.